Posted on February 16, 2018

We've got big news- DCFOF now has a Transitional Housing program! 

We are best known as the emergency shelter in the area, but for years now our agency has been building our capacity in order to provide transitional housing. When you think about everything that goes into a survivor of domestic violence thriving on their own- enough money saved for a deposit on a house or apartment, a stable job earning enough to make ends meet, transportation to get herself and her kids to/from work and school, and a support system to help her through it- 30 days in emergency shelter is just not enough. 

That is where our new program comes in! We know that for many survivors of family violence, for their life apart from their abuser to be sustainable they need more time to build a foundation. After exiting our emergency shelter, clients can now move in to their very own apartment thanks to our Transitional Housing program! We are able to help victims of sexual and domestic violence secure safe housing options as they transition out of the emergency shelter, flee from an abusive home or are recovering from the financial abuse that 98% of victims of domestic violence experience. The transitional housing program provides safe housing combined with comprehensive services to assist victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in their path to independence and emotional well-being. 

The launch of our transitional housing program will meet a critical need for domestic violence and sexual assault victims as they struggle to achieve financial stability. The program is funded by awards from the Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) and the Criminal Justice Division Grant (CJD). ESG offers short term housing assistance for those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. CJD offers financial assistance for 6-18 months and additional services such as counseling, life skills, budgeting, and employment. 

Our First Client 

Dr. Nicole Roberts Ph.D, DCFOF, Executive Program Director announced last week that "we placed our first transitional housing client into a safe and comfortable home. She is a single mom with small children so the needs for her move in were significant".  

Included in the vision of this program is that the homes are furnished, decorated and stocked with essentials as families move in. DCFOF Executive Director, Toni Johnson-Simpson, had this to say about the vision: " families should be able to maintain their dignity even in their most desperate of times". In an effort to achieve this objective DCFOF has partnered with Latter House Décor. 

Shalonda Waggoner is the President and Founder of LatterHouse Décor and a survivor of domestic violence. Shalonda works to help clients access “a beautiful beginning to their best life”. The mission of LatterHouse Decor is to provide no cost interior decorating services to women and families who have been hurt due to domestic violence. The LatterHouse crew helped DCFOF furnish and decorate our client’s home with donated items. 

It took an enormous amount of teamwork to make all the details come together and make this house a home for our client. We are grateful for the community partners that made this happen. 

How Can You Help? 

Become a Housing Partner! The support of donors and volunteers are the difference in a child sleeping on an air mattress or in a toddler bed. You are the sofas, dishes and groceries that make the families we serve find hope again. Without your support we could not aide in the positive change in the lives of the women and children we serve. 

If you would like to learn more about how to support the efforts of our transitional housing program with time, talent or treasure and become a Housing Partner email donate@dcfof.org. 

Thank you for investing in safety, hope, healing, justice, and prevention for victims of sexual and domestic violence in our community. 

Check out our first client's gorgeous home! 

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Typical warning signs of abuse

1 in 4 women will experience intimate partner violence

591 clients were served through legal services in 2017